Beachland Ballroom

Train / Goo Goo Dolls / Allen Stone - Aug 14 - Blossom Music Center

Train/Goo Goo Dolls – Aug 14 – Blossom Music Center

Lineup: Train
Goo Goo Dolls
Allen Stone

Aug 14, 2019 Wed 7:00 PM EDT
Blossom Music Center in Cuyahoga Falls, Ohio  See Venue Info

Tickets

 

 

 

 

Read more

Samantha Fish to perform at The Beachland Ballroom with special guest Jontavious Willis - Thurs Aug 15th

 

Samantha Fish with special guest Jontavious Willis perform at the Beachland Ballroom Thurs Aug 15th
7pm Doors
 
Read more

INKCARCERATION Music and Tattoo Festival Reveals Daily Set Times and Stages

INKCARCERATION Music and Tattoo Festival Reveals Daily Set Times and Stages

 

The Second Annual INKCARCERATION: Taking Place July 12-14, 2019 at the Historic Ohio State Reformatory | GET TICKETS HERE!

 

INKCARCERATION 2019 to Also Feature…

Read more

INKCARCERATION Music and Tattoo Festival Reveals Daily Set Times and Stages

The Second Annual INKCARCERATION: Taking Place July 12-14, 2019 at the Historic Ohio State Reformatory | GET TICKETS HERE!

 

INKCARCERATION 2019 to Also Feature:

70+ Tattoo Artists

Food Trucks & Beverages

Tent & RV Camping

“…

Read more

NEW MUSIC: Thomas Rhett shares "Remember You Young" off CENTER POINT ROAD

NEW MUSIC: Thomas Rhett shares “Remember You Young” off CENTER POINT ROAD

THOMAS RHETT INVITES FANS TO EXPERIENCE MORE OF CENTER POINT ROAD WITH NEW SONG “REMEMBER YOU YOUNG” OUT NOW

 

ACM Awards Male Artist of the Year and multi-PLATIN…

Read more

Samantha Fish to perform at The Beachland Ballroom with special guest Jontavious Willis – Thurs Aug 15th

Posted on

 

Samantha Fish with special guest Jontavious Willis perform at the Beachland Ballroom Thurs Aug 15th
7pm Doors

“That was my mission on this album: To really set these songs up so that they have a life of their own,” says Samantha Fish about Kill or Be Kind, her sixth solo album and her debut on Rounder Records. “Strong messages from the heart – that’s what I really set out for.” Indeed, what comes across immediately on hearing the album is the extraordinary level of songcraft on its eleven tracks, the way these songs are so smartly put together to deliver a potent emotional impact.

Anyone who has ever heard Fish’s previous albums knows that she has earned a place in the top rank of contemporary blues guitarists and that her voice can wring the soul out of a ballad and belt out a rocker with roof-shaking force. And, rest reassured, those virtues are fully in evidence on Kill or Be Kind. But each of the songs on the album does far more than simply provide a setting for Fish’s pyrotechnics. They tell captivating stories, set up by verses that deftly set the scene, choruses that lift with real feeling, and hooks that later rise up in your thoughts, even when you’re not aware that you’re thinking of music at all. It’s the kind of songwriting that emerges when raw talent is leavened by experience and aspiration, and when a committed artist genuinely has something to say. Those qualities make Kill or Be Kind a genuine artistic breakthrough for Fish.

“I think I’ve grown as a performer and as a player,” she explains. “I’ve become more respectful of the melody. You can go up and down the fret board and up and down your vocal register, but that’s not going to be as powerful as conveying a simple melody that people can really connect to and sing themselves.” To help bring those elements to her music, Fish sought out high-quality songwriting collaborators – the likes of Jim McCormick (who has worked with Fish before and also written for Luke Bryan and Keith Urban); Kate Pearlman (who has worked with Kelly Clarkson); Patrick Sweeney; Parker Millsap; and Eric McFadden. The result is an album on which each song is distinct, but the complete work hangs together as a coherent, entirely satisfying statement. “When you get to this point in your life as an artist,” Fish says, “it’s good to work with others, because it makes you stretch. I think you hear a lot of that nuance on the record, songs that have a pop sensibility to them, hooks that really pull you in.”

You get a good sense of the range the album covers from the first two songs released. Fish propels “Watch It Die” with an insistent guitar riff, but near the song’s end two female background singers lend the song a haunting soulful feel. Meanwhile, “Love Letters” moves on an insinuating, stop-time riff in its verses until it bursts in passion on its chorus. Both songs use horn sections for finesse and texture. “Love Letters” also introduces one of the album’s central themes: the allure of losing yourself in love – and the dangers of it. “Keep waking up in the bed I made,” Fish sings. “Forget the pain when you wanna play/I’m back to broken when you go away.”

“That’s just a love-sick song,” Fish says, laughing. “like I think I was when I wrote it.” The title track, a seductive ballad, offers a lover a stark choice: “Make up your mind/I can kill or be kind.” To explain that dichotomy, Fish says, “It’s funny how love can be so fickle, how quickly you go from object of affection to one of disdain. I’ve always found that dynamic interesting. That track is full of that duality,” she adds, laughing. “I also loved the Memphis sound of the horns on there. They sound modern, but it’s got this vintage feeling as well.” The songs “Dirty,” “Love Your Lies” and “Fair-Weather” explore similar themes – how deceit, self-deception and shifting expectations can alter the course of life and love. The affecting ballad “Dream Girl” stands the endearment of its title on its head and explores the dilemma of a love not coming to fruition. “I wish you’d take the rest of me,” Fish sings. “These tears, they kill your fantasy.” On “She Don’t Live Around Here Anymore,” a soul ballad once again bolstered by tasteful horn parts, the singer confronts the feeling of being used and finds empowerment in walking away.

The album is framed by songs — “Bulletproof” and “You Got It Bad (Better Than You Ever Had).” “Bulletproof digs into the theme of vulnerability, about it being mistaken for weakness, and how we often times feel the need to wear a mask to survive in the world today, while “You Got It Bad (Better Than You Ever Had)” is about working towards your dreams and the knifes edge we often walk to reach our goals.

“Trying Not to Fall in Love With You” finds the singer not wanting to rush a relationship – and therefore undermine it. “I fall fast,” Fish admits, “I have to remember to take care and not scare the person away.”

To make Kill or Be Kind, Fish chose to work at the legendary Royal Studios in Memphis, with Scott Billington as producer. “I worked at Royal before, when I made my Wild Heart album,” she says. “The soul in the walls, the vibe – you can feel it in that place. I’m such a fan of Al Green, Ann Peebles and all the classic recordings that happened there. Memphis just kept calling to me. I’ve always felt so inspired there.” As for Billington, a three-time Grammy winner, Fish appreciated both his open-mindedness and his willingness to ease her out of her comfort zone. “Scott allowed me to see the building-out process of the album all the way through, from the top to the bottom,” she says. “Bringing in background singers and synthesizers, which I’d never done on an album before, that added an extra edge. Honestly, it was a challenge. It pushed me to think about the songs differently. That trust from my producer gave me the freedom to really take some risks.”

Having completed an album that she believes in so strongly – “This is me coming through, my personality,” she says – Fish is eager to bring it to the world. “I got the moon in the back of my mind, and I want to shoot for it!” she declares. “I want to reach over genre lines and get out to as many people as possible. This album is so broad – and it’s all me. So I’m just hoping it catches people and appeals to them.”

She concludes, “Overall my big goal, career-wise, is to contribute something different and new to music. I want to give something that stands apart and yet is timeless.” With Kill or Be Kind, Samantha Fish is well on her way along that path. – Anthony DeCurtis

Every generation or so a young bluesman bursts onto the scene. Someone who sends a jolt through blues lovers. Someone who has mastered the craft for sure, but who also has the blues deep down in his heart and soul.

At the age of 22, bluesman JONTAVIOUS WILLIS may be the one.

“That’s my Wonderboy, the Wunderkind,” Taj Mahal said after inviting Jontavious to play on stage in 2015. “He’s a great new voice of the twenty-first century in the acoustic blues. I just love the way he plays.”

“When I heard him play I said to myself: this is how the blues, as I know it, is going to stay alive,” said Paul Oscher.

“Only a few like him emerge every decade or so, when even the most hard core blues fans realize immediately that this is the real deal,” writes Frank Matheis in Living Blues Magazine.

Hailing from Greenville, Ga., Jontavious grew up singing gospel music at the Mount Pilgrim Baptist Church with his grandfather. At the age of 14, he came across a YouTube video of Muddy Waters playing “Hoochie Coochie Man” and was hooked. That’s when he set his course on the blues. All types — Delta, Piedmont, Texas, gospel. As a fingerpicker, flat-picker and slide player. On guitar, harmonica, banjo and cigar box.

And four years later he was playing on Taj Mahal’s stage.

Currently Jontavious is finishing his studies at Columbus State University, majoring in sociology. But on most weekends you can find him playing a small house show, up on the main stage or posting music videos for his friends and fans around the world.

Venue Information:
Beachland Ballroom
15711 Waterloo Rd
Cleveland, OH, 44110

Bumpin Uglies to bring it tonight at the Beachland Ballroom 10/5

Posted on

Tonight at the Beachland Ballroom Friday Oct 5th

Bumpin Uglies, Joint Operation and The Intangibles.

A great night of entertainment makes its return to the Beachland Ballroom.

Fans of Bumpin Uglies will more than likely give a heavy dose tonight. So make your way tonight.

Tickets

Joint Operation, The Intangibles
Friday Oct 5, 2018

Doors: 8:00 PM
Show: 9:00 PM

All Ages

$12 – $15

 

Bumpin Uglies with Stacked Like Pancakes, The Intangibles -Fri Oct 5th Beachland Ballroom

Posted on Updated on

Bumpin Uglies +Stacked Like Pancakes, The Intangibles

Friday Oct 5, 2018

Doors: 8:00 PM
Show: 9:00 PM

All Ages

$12 – $15
Beachland Ballroom
15711 Waterloo Road
Cleveland, OH

 

Follow:  FB | Twitter | Youtube | Official

Stacked Like Pancakes (SLP) is a boisterous Baltimore-based brass-rock band.

Beginning in 2007, Stacked Like Pancakes was founded on an idolization of artists like Reel Big Fish, Streetlight Manifesto, and Less Than Jake. Following the 2011 debut ska album We’re Not Insane, SLP and renaissance frontman-songwriter Kellen McKay began to develop an obsession with breaking genre boundaries. SLP has since proven to maintain a thick sonic texture through a synthesis of inspirations including Reel Big Fish, twenty one pilots, Foo Fighters, Paramore, Cage the Elephant, and an untraceable amount of other artists and genres.

Stacked Like Pancakes found their niche in music festivals in 2012, supporting Kid Cudi at Towson University’s Tigerfest. In 2014, SLP won the Ernie Ball Battle of the Bands competition, earning their first appearance on the Vans Warped Tour. When they were invited to return in 2015, the Warped Tour sparked a love for the road. In March 2017, Stacked Like Pancakes was a featured artist for the Vans Warped Tour, performing alongside Bless the Fall, Memphis May Fire, Jule Vera, and Microwave at the official Warped Tour Kickoff Party in Orlando, Florida. During this stretch of time, SLP embarked on several self-booked headlining tours, a national tour supporting ska-parallels Reel Big Fish, and in 2015 released their fan-funded sophomore album THIS IS US.

Concert venues and music patrons alike should be prepared for the stage to shake, the crowd to be wild and unpredictable, and the show to be a deliberate fusion of spontaneity and precision. The band’s trumpet and two trombonists won’t be standing in the back or blending in with the backdrop as mere support. In this self-proclaimed brass-rock band, the horns will steal the show, and the Pancake Nation community fanbase is hungry for their band to grow.

Stacked Like Pancakes epitomizes a tough DIY band despite a meaningless band name, and are rightfully on the rise to claim an international stage of their own.

HELMET – pictures and Interview (Cleveland) May 20th

Posted on Updated on

Helmet and Prong performed at the legendary Beachland Ballroom on May 20th 2018.

Below are a few pictures as well as interview with Page Hamilton of Helmet. (Pictures courtesy of Crissy Dansak)

pictures courtesy of Crissy Dansak

Interview with Page Hamilton – HELMET

with Douglas Esper

Douglas Esper: Helmet just finished up a run with Prong. You guys have a long history. How fun was it?

 

Page Hamilton: Great. I was really happy with it.

 

DE: The tour leg was pretty jam-packed. I saw you in Cleveland on one of the last few dates, but you guys were all still enjoying yourselves.

 

PH: Yeah, we always do that. I love touring. I love being on the road. I would tour more if I could actually. I don’t need to go home for anything.

 

DE: Helmet has had several line-ups over the years. What makes this current group stand out and how did you all come together?

PH: I auditioned guys from different bands and these guys all stepped up. I love this line up.

DE: How did you choose, ‘Green Shirt’ for the Dead To The World album?”

PH: That’s an Elvis Costello cover. It’s from his Armed Forces album. I just love the song. I thought it fit thematically with the material we did on our album. We produced five cover songs and that was the one that ended up on the album.

DE: I read today that you were involved in the soundtrack for the movie Heat. It’s one of my favorite movies and I’ve listened to the soundtrack over and over and I had no idea you were involved. What was your role in it?

PH: Warner Bros. put the soundtrack out. They had tried to sign Helmet. They were like the last label. It was down to them and Interscope. Even after (We chose Interscope) they were supportive of my guitar playing and of me. They introduced me to Elliot Goldenthal. He was looking to do a guitar orchestral sort of thing. They hired me and it turned out really good.

DE: Compared to previous releases I felt like Dead To The World featured more melodic vocal lines driving the song, even over the riffs which are typically the signature aspect of a Helmet song. Was this a conscious decision or a natural progression in your songwriting?

PH: Nothing is ever calculated. I just write what I feel like.

DE: The recording industry is constantly evolving. What advice do you give to new bands trying to find their way into the business?

PH: I just got a text today from a guy in Nashville. He said, ‘I’m in a band and we’re going on tour opening for (some band)’ and he asked me for advice. I said just do your thing. There’s not much you can say. Be honest. That’s what I say. Bands that are overly concerned with response or with the market or with likes or dislikes or whatever, I’m not down with that. Make music you believe in and be honest about it.

DE: How much of the song, ‘Just Another Victim’ was written prior to Helmet being approached to appear on the Judgment Night Soundtrack and how much happened in the studio with Everlast?

PH: We wrote it in the session. I had the riff though already. I had that cool riff. The guys in House of Pain and my band, we went into a studio that I had done a lot of work in, in New York. They asked, ‘What’re we going to do?’ I said, write a song. A lot of that fell on me. I said ‘I’ve got a really badass riff. We’ll use this.’”

DE: What’s next for Helmet?

PH: We’re going to finish this tour and then we go to Europe for some festivals and headlining shows intermingled. September we have off before going to South America in October. November and December we’re looking at west coast dates, hopefully more dates with Prong. We’re looking at Europe in the spring. We’re looking at packaging us and Prong again for over there. And we’ll probably record sometime between now and then. I’ve been writing and working on other stuff.

pictures courtesy of Crissy Dansak